The Wombat’s Teeth

The Wombat’s Teeth

Wombats are Australian marsupials. This article is about the wombat’s teeth.

Wombats

The wombat’s teeth is important to a wombat, like with every other animal with their teeth. A wombat’s daily diet is composed of roots, grasses, herbs, juicy stems and or sedges. At times, there are roots, stems and sedges that are very tough and fibrous. The wombat’s teeth is sharp enough to chew through all these.

Though a wombat’s teeth is sharp, there are just some situations or instances that they can help but lose a tooth or 2. But they don’t need to worry about that.

One unique and versatile characteristic of a wombat is that their teeth grow back if they lose any all throughout their lives. If a wombat accidentally lose a tooth, it’ll just grow back again. That’s why they are naturally inquisitive, they don’t need to worry if they lose or break a tooth. They can bite through any stuff and not worry if they’ll lose a tooth or not. Because they’ll just grow back, easily.

This characteristic really fits the wombat. Because with their lifestyle it’s very fitting. Since they have to chew through fibrous roots, stems and or sedges. They don’t have to be cautious with what they put in their mouths or about to chew.

A wombat’s incisor teeth is similar to a placental rodent. Their dental formula is 1.0.1.4 over 1.0.1.4. Their incisors are sharp and are primarily used to tear down the stuff that they put inside their mouths.

A wombat also uses it’s teeth to bite it’s attacker. And yes, the wombat’s teeth are indeed very strong and sharp. One reported incident of a wombat attack and the victim is a man. The wombat was able to bite through thick denim, woolen sock and a rubber boot and still succeeded in injuring the man with very deep punctured wounds.

Wombats

That’s why, you should never under estimate the power and uniqueness of the wombat’s teeth.

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